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of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
was on pakistan's safe havens there. that where many in washington believe al qaeda was hiding. big concerns they naif found a breathing space in afghanistan. >> if they have a breathing space in afghanistan, we are nearing a decade mark in this conflict. can you push al qaeda out of afghanistan permanently, and the subquestion in that scenario has been when will the afghans be ready to do this themselves? when will they take the lead in the army and police? where are we there? >> reporter: very difficult to answer that. the immediate reaction is the afghans are nowhere near ready. the bulk of the army, the guys we saw in that piece, that report back there, only 5 out of 15 willing to go on patrol one morning. many patrols turned back because the afghans weren't ready to go down. concerns there certainly if they are trying to hunt down the remnants of al qaeda or perhaps returning al qaeda elements within pakistan, those are afghan army soldiers we came across on the job. frankly, also the american presence isn't strong or sophisticated or maybe well equipped enough to go after those element
were killed in 60 hours of terror. blamed on militants based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been describe as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever's behind them, they've shown that india's largest city is still vulnerable. caroline hawley, bbc news. >>> the president and congressional negotiators return to the debt negotiations table today after yesterday's meeting ended in confrontation. those in the meeting said that president obama announced enough is enough, we have to be willing to compromise, before walking out of the room. the moody's rating service is threatening to downgrade the nation's credit rating because of this crisis. >> both sides really locking horns. >>> new light is being shed on the problem of american kids and obesity. and two harvard doctors are weighing in. >> what they're saying about overweight children has just about everybody taking sides on this. abc's lana zach explans the controversy. >> reporter: thanks, peggy and daniel. it's really a radical idea and it's intended to get people talking about childhood obesity. in "the
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)